ICF Core Set for adults with cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common motor developmental disorders in children, with 2-3 new cases per 1,000 live births. Although CP occurs during infancy and early childhood, the majority of the people with CP are adults. Adults with CP have disabilities and some health conditions such as joint deformity, pain and fatigue etc. and are consumers of multiple health and social resources. Given this, having a common language to facilitate communication across disciplines and sectors, health care systems and services, as well as being able to identify and measure outcome are essential. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) can serve as a common language and could also prove to be helpful in standardizing the selection of outcome measures in adults with CP.

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ICF Core Sets for Cerebral Palsy in CY

Cerebral Palsy (CP) describes a group of development disorders of movement and posture commonly associated with other co-morbidities (e.g., sensory, cognitive, communication). CP is the most common cause of severe physical disability in childhood. The current estimate of incidence of CP is 2 to 2.5 per 1,000 live births in developed countries. CP is associated with a heterogeneous level of disability. The assessment of those challenges in functioning is at the core of clinical practice in CP, which is multidisciplinary by nature. There is currently neither a single questionnaire used in children with CP that covers the broad perspective that the ICF represents nor a consensus on the most appropriate instrument that assesses the effects of CP on everyday life. Furthermore, there is a lack of guidelines on how to select the most appropriate outcome measure to evaluate a specific intervention on this population, therefore it is difficult to compare results from different studies.

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Development of ICF Core Sets for Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

The ICF Core Set development project for multiple sclerosis (MS) was a cooperative effort between Valens Rehabilitation Centre (Switzerland), the ICF Research Branch, the World Health Organisation (WHO), the Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF) and the International Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (ISPRM). The aim of the project was the development of ICF Core Sets to comprehensively describe functioning and disability of individuals with MS.

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Development of ICF Core Sets for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

To describe and rate the consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI), a wide range of measures has been used. Unfortunately, there is a wide variation in currently available measures, including variation in underlying dimensions and terminological confusion as well as difficulty in carrying over data from one episode of care - emergency, medical, rehabilitative, outpatient and community clinical care - to another episode of care involving a different clinical focus. To address this clinical information need, the project aimed to develop ICF Core Sets to comprehensively describe functioning and disability of individuals with SCI.

 

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Development of ICF Core Sets for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

A major issue for professionals working with traumatic brain injury (TBI) concerns the large variation in currently available measures to address function and disability in TBI. There is little standardization in the use of these instruments and therefore, comparison of data is quite difficult. The objective of the ICF Core Set development project for persons with TBI was to identify relevant categories which comprehensively describe and measure the spectrum of limitations in functioning of persons with TBI. The project was a collaborative effort between the Guttmann Institute, the ICF Research Branch, the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (ISPRM). The enormous organization of completing all 4 preliminary studies culminating in the consensus conference which took place in Barcelona from 26-28 March 2010 was under the leadership of the Brain Injury Unit at the Guttmann Institute.

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